Access TOG

Mobility and Access The Outdoor Guide (Mobility&AccessTOG) works with Debbie North to make the inaccessible accessible for people with disabilities, their families and their friends.

Debbie our AccessTOG Mobility Guru and the Mountain Trike: Review

Debbie takes us for an accessible walk around Malham Tarn.

Debbie visits North Yorkshire and tells us about her stay in the Craven Arms, Giggleswick.

Mobility and Access The Outdoor Guide (Mobility&AccessTOG) and Debbie North – making the inaccessible accessible.

Mobility and Access The Outdoor Guide (Mobility&AccessTOG) is committed to creating a countryside for all through the development of wheel-friendly treks for people with poor or no mobility in and around places such as the Yorkshire Dales and Lake District.

Mobility and Access The Outdoor Guide (Mobility&AccessTOG) is proud to work alongside The Outdoor Guide with Julia Bradbury, putting together complete wheelchair-friendly packages for wonderful days out in the hills, valleys and beaches, including the perfect pit stops, the perfect accommodation and the perfect cuppa.

This means you’ll often come across Debs and Andy on a hillside or somewhere researching new routes that are accessible for people with disabilities.

If they’re not outdoors, chances are they’ll be in a cafe researching hot chocolate. With marshmallows. And squirty cream.

access-dales-about-debsWhen I founded accessthedales in 2011, it was simply a blog.
Something for me to focus on during my long periods of illness.

In my previous ‘life’, before I became a wheelchair user, I was a keen hill walker and spent much of my time in the Yorkshire Dales, the Lake District and completing long distance walks like the Coast to Coast, The Dales Way and Cumbria Way.
From a hospital bed I began researching all-terrain wheelchairs (ATW) as I was keen to get back out into the hills, despite having to now use a wheelchair.
At the same I raised the funds to get a Tramper for the National Trust, which is now housed at the Malham Tarn Estate and is available for hire for a small charge.
Since then, as a result of major spinal surgery, I have got stronger and am now fulfilling my passion of hill walking by using an ATW. My real passion is finding routes that are longer, higher and more challenging. A real up close and personal experience, if you like, with hills, mountains and weather.
From writing my first ever blog I can honestly say that accessthedales has grown beyond anything I ever expected.

Andy, my husband and my walking partner, has supported me all the way.

In 2015 we created our own coast to coast route, travelling from St Bees to Robin Hood’s Bay. We followed bridleways and paths that were accessible to us.
Our first book was published in August 2016. ‘In The Spirit Of Wainwright’ (Sigma Press) is a guidebook of our journey. It hopefully encourages others to make their own adventures.

In April 2016 we created a new 6 day, 81mile long distance route through the Yorkshire Dales and Cumbria. We called it “The Coast to Coast To Coast’ – from the shores of Semerwater to the shores of Ullswater, finishing on the shores of Bassenthwaite Lake. It was a wonderful experience. The route will be published in our second book – funnily enough called ‘The Coast To Coast To Coast’ in 2017 (Sigma Press).

I am so pleased to be working alongside Julia, and the TOG team to create and develop all types of wheelchair accessible routes – from an easy stroll along the canal side to the more challenging routes up mountains and down dales. We will be finding hotels that are wheelchair accessible and looking for places to eat that are also wheelchair friendly.

KEYNOTE SPEAKING

As a keynote speaker, Debbie has drawn on her experiences as a lover of the great outdoors who has seen it all snatched away by chronic spinal degeneration through to her becoming a respected voice and author in the world of accessibility.

Debbie now brings her knowledge and experiences from her ATW to the world as an inspiring motivational speaker. Her story, In The Spirit Of Wainwright, can be tailored to provide relevance and motivation for virtually every type of audience with her presentations being able to focus on a variety of topics.

access-dales-blog-pic-500I first walked Wainwright’s Coast To Coast in 1999 with my partner, Andy. We walked it again in 2003 because our camera was broken first time round and Andy had forgotten to propose to me. At the end of our second crossing, Andy proposed to me as we stood in the sea. For many reasons, I have a very special love of the Coast To Coast.

In 2007, we moved to live on a farm in Lincolnshire. That’s when the problems began. It’s not Lincolnshire’s fault. Or the farm’s. No, the fault can be solely laid at the doorstep of my spine… if spine’s have doorsteps, that is.

Early in 2008, I started having problems with my back. It turned out I had spinal degeneration. To say my life – our lives – changed in a heartbeat would be an understatement. In the following period, I lost my job due to ill-health, my hillwalking hobby and, it seemed, my life. We moved from the farm. We had to. We bought a bungalow in the Lincolnshire Wolds as we prepared for my health to simply go downhill from here. I was on enough daily medication to bring down an elephant and then some.

Life was now a constant battle against the twenty-four seven pain inflicted by bone spurs compressing the nerves in my spine. Chronic. Agonising. Debilitating.

In 2011, I founded accessthedales. I figured if I yearned to be out in the countryside, there must be other people in my situation.

Our first efforts at getting out into the ‘wilds’ was no more than a simple jaunt along the footpath to Gordale Scar in the Yorkshire Dales. After all, it was only a footpath of a couple of hundred metres or so. And I was in my beast of an electric wheelchair. It was no big deal. Except, it was a big deal – on two counts. It was a big deal in the sense that the wheelchair, robust though it is, couldn’t deal with a public right of way in the Yorkshire Dales, which is in pretty good nick. The other sense… I was out there. Yes, we had to kick the smallest of stones out of the way (those brushes they use in curling would have been mighty useful here) to make headway, but I got there in the end… Gordale Scar. Was this as far as I would ever get? Not a chance!

In 2013, by sheer fluke, Andy was watching the local news and saw a feature about a company based just a fifteen minute drive away from us. They’d just won an innovation award for their robust all-terrain wheelchair – TerrainHopper.

Well, then life got complicated by a three month stay in hospital (with no weight-bearing), an 8 hour operation to put rods in my spine, a high speed car crash (not our fault!!!) and a serious bout of pneumonia. And it was when I was lying ill with pneumonia that I sent a card to Andy proclaiming that, in April 2015, we would do the Coast To Coast. After he came round and I slapped him a few times, he agreed it was a brilliant idea. Our erstwhile pal, Jonathan Smith of Where2Walk (who had been there on our very first accessthedales outing to Gordale Scar) announced I was completely “crackers” and promptly agreed to help.

On April 12th 2015, we left a rain-lashed St Bees and arrived in Robin Hood’s Bay on April 25th. I travelled in a TerrainHopper.

coast-to-coast-to-coast-logo-300In April 2016, I am setting off on a new long distance trek, the Coast To Coast To Coast. It is a route we have devised which can be travelled by people with disabilities using an all-terrain wheelchair. It starts at Semerwater in Wensleydale and finishes at Bassenthwaite in the Lake District. It covers a distance of about 81 miles.

Again, accessthedales is fundraising – for the Calvert Trust Kielder and the Cumbria Community Foundation Flood Appeal. Currently we are crowdfunding to cover our expenses for this journey. If it’s something you’d like to know more about, please view the link and/or share it around with others who might be interested by what we’re doing.

View the JustGiving page here.

In April 2015, I trekked coast to coast with Andy, my husband, in a TerrainHopper, a 4×4 all-terrain wheelchair (ATW).

Here’s our top tips for such an adventure:
access-dales-top-tips-image

  • ATWs are all different.  Research.  Match your ATW to your goals/needs.
  • Know your ATW is capable of dealing with distances, difficult terrain and bear traps in the North York Moors.
  • Plan routes and emergency routes should the weather turn.
  • You have many wilderness miles to explore.  Consult an expert.  Ours is Jonathan Smith at www.where2walk.co.uk
  • Book accommodation carefully!  Often a place offered accessible rooms but nowhere to charge the TerrainHopper.  Or they could store the TerrainHopper, but not us up as we were far too common.  People heard ‘wheelchair’ but not ‘all-terrain’.
  • Know where your accommodation is.  We fell foul of this in Shap.  Our bed for the night was four miles south.  We had a brilliant back up driver.  We were saved.
  • Clothing –  Think waterproof.  Think windproof. Think warm. I wear merino wool long johns and base wear.
  • When traversing difficult terrain, don’t be badgered into things.  If it feels unsafe, don’t try it.
  • TerrainHopper is a Class 2/3 mobility product.  It’s entitled to travel where anyone on foot can.  You may be challenged.  Know your rights.   It’s supposed to be access for all so it should be access for all.
  • Get out there -live it, love it, feel it!

Reviews

Testimonial from Lincolnshire Wolds Walking Festival

debbie-waw-conferenceDebbie gave a fabulous presentation at the National Walkers Are Welcome conference over the weekend. We were talking about it afterwards and she mentioned that you might be interested to know how it was received.

Debbie gave a potted history of her personal journey from active hill walker and head teacher through ill health and life changes, to her development with husband Andy of Access the Dales and their goal to ‘make the inaccessible accessible’. Of course she also gave plenty of time to The Outdoor Guide and her work (and friendship) with Julia Bradbury.

The presentation (with Andy in support, driving the powerpoint) was absolutely seamless, and well judged, with moments of comedy neatly interspersed with her sometimes desperately unhappy story, together with some powerful messages about the importance of equality and access for all. The event compere noted at the end of Debbie’s talk that he had never seen an audience so completely engaged for 30 minutes, nobody moved!

Our conference team were delighted with what Debbie added to the event, it was definitely the highlight of our day and I’m looking forward to working with Debbie/Andy and TerrainHopper at the Lincolnshire Wolds Walking Festival in 2017.”

Wheelchair Friendly Walks

Julia and her parents try out a terrain hopper at the Keswick Mountain Festival.

“Deb’s story touched our hearts and we are thrilled to support her campaign.”
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