Kristina’s Wheel Friendly Cliff Path Walk at Aberporth, Ceredigion

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trainNearest Train (or tube) Station(s):
Haverfordwest

Nearest Mainline Train Station:
Swansea

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Walk Details
Aberporth nestles on the West Wales coast. It is a pretty little village clinging to the hillside. In tourist season there are a variety of cafe’s and pubs. The Water’s Edge cafe has a slope up to it, the staff are friendly. However due to the old style of building there isn’t a disabled toilet. However in the main car parks by the beach, there is a disabled toilet, accessed by a radar key. The pub The ship provides meals and beverages and is also disabled accessible.

The beaches are not easily accessed for those using a wheelchair. However there is a lovely Cliff Path part of the Wales Coast path. The path is a tarmac path which leads towards Tresiath.

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The path in undulating and on be stretch is quite steep. Unless you’re the fittest of the fit wheelchair user, you may need help or a powered solution. The path has uncompromising views out to see. On a clear day you can see as far up as North Wales. You can sometimes see Dolphins or seals swimming in Cardigan Bay as well as a variety of birds.

There are benches along the way for people to sit and stop to take in the tranquil views. At the beginning of the path is wheelchair access picnic bench with views up the coast offering a lovely spot to stop and have a picnic. The end of the tarmac stretch is a turning point, before the path narrows and turns into steps down towards Tresaith. The car park at the Aberporth end has two disabled bays, which are charged by means of an honesty box.


Kristina’s Verdict:
I love trundling this stretch, there is nothing lovelier than the wind on your face, with the smell of the sea invigorating your senses. Unless driving rain there is no bad weather to do this path.

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