Horton-In-Ribblesdale to Hull Pot

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trainNearest Train (or tube) Station(s):
Horton-in-Ribblesdale

Nearest Mainline Train Station:
Carlisle, Leeds

Remember to prepare properly before heading out on any type of walk or outdoor activity. Tell people where you are going and what time you are expected back. As Wainwright says “There’s no such thing as bad weather, only unsuitable clothing”.

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Horton-In-Ribblesdale to Hull Pot
Park at the car park in Horton-in-Ribblesdale, which is just down the road from the Pen-y-Ghent Cafe… a good place to catch a brew, although it’s reported there are no toilets for public use.  Accessible toilets available in the car park about 150 yards away, but you do need a Radar Key.

The route offers a steady yet challenging climb up to Hull Pot and back again.  Horton Scar Lane, which you climb up, is rough and only suitable for a rugged all-terrain wheelchair.  We’ve climbed up here in the TerrainHopper with no problems.  It’s worth noting this is part of ‘A Pennine Journey’, Alfred Wainwright’s 1938 odyssey!

Hull Pot is accessed by a bridleway, which can prove to be rather boggy in places.  The reward for this trek is a feeling of being in the midst of splendid scenery, views towards Pen-y-Ghent and, of course, the magnificent Hull Pot, complete with waterfall in the wettest of weather.

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