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An assortment of interesting stop off points along our walks.

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A selection of campsites as well as glamorous camping locations.

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trainNearest Train (or tube) Station(s):
Bangor

Nearest Mainline Train Station:
Crewe

Remember to prepare properly before heading out on any type of walk or outdoor activity. Tell people where you are going and what time you are expected back. As Wainwright says “There’s no such thing as bad weather, only unsuitable clothing”.

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Walk Details
This is an action-packed outing, comprising forest trails, sandy beaches and a whole host of possible wildlife sightings. Something for all tastes and, level terrain throughout.

The huge area covered by Newborough Forest is located at the southern most corner of the island. Easily accessed via the A5 and B4419 or A545 and A4080. Malltraeth village lies a short distance north of the forest. Parking within the forest exists, just off the A4080, but to take in the sands where huge colonies of wading birds are found, it’s necessary to park in the lay- by across the river, (Afon Cefni) at Malltraech.

The walk kicks off from the lay-by at Malltraech, then unfolds along the embankment dividing the pools, and the extensive area of salt marsh – habitat for hundreds of wading birds etc Incidentally, a former doyen of wildlife artists, the late C. F. Tunnicliffe, lived in a cottage overlooking the estuary.

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Pass through a forest car park walking close to the main road, until approaching the wildlife pool sign. There is no sign now – just follow the path which bends to the right. At that point, turn right – into Newborough Forest and begin a four mile journey towards the promontory known as Llanddwyn Island.

Follow a wide and sometimes twisting vehicle track throughout. Ignore all turn offs, including a rather ambiguous junction 16, turn right and head seawards.

At the beach turn right, to visit the promontory (be aware of incoming tides) to witness the tall cross, ruins, the white tower and spectacular views of the mountains. Aim for the information shelter to pick up the main path. Returning to the beach entry point, the walk route continues (eastwards), along the exquisite beach of Llanddwyn Bay.

Stroll along the beach until the trees of the forest peter out. At that point, leave the beach to follow a path that runs outside the forest boundary for a straight mile. (A fence has been replaced, path now about 10 metres inside the forest). Where the forest ends abruptly – keep straight on, curving slightly to the right, to reach an information board (300 yards). At that point, turn sharp left along a grassed track leading on to a road.

At a road junction turn left, then after passing the last house on the right, go through a kissing gate. Cross the field gradually curving left, to re-enter the forest at another gate. Turn right. Reaching a T junction turn right, then at the next T junction (marshes ahead) turn right again and return to the original point of entry.
Turn left. Pass through the car park and retrace earlier steps along the embankment.

Shortly after you can turn off to the left following the Anglesey Coastal Path signs, and walk along the forest edge back to the car park.

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Disclaimer:
This route was correct at time of writing. However, alterations can happen if development or boundary changes occur, and there is no guarantee of permanent access. These walks have been published for use by site visitors on the understanding that neither HPB Management Limited nor any other person connected with Holiday Property Bond (The Outdoor Guide or Julia Bradbury) is responsible for the safety or wellbeing of those following the routes as described. It is walkers’ own responsibility to be adequately prepared and equipped for the level of walk and the weather conditions and to assess the safety and accessibility of the walk.