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pitstop-key-iconPitstops
An assortment of interesting stop off points along our walks.

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A selection of campsites as well as glamorous camping locations.

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Handpicked boutique luxury to family and pet friendly hotels.

trainNearest Train (or tube) Station(s):
Swanage Railway

Nearest Mainline Train Station:
Bournemouth

Remember to prepare properly before heading out on any type of walk or outdoor activity. Tell people where you are going and what time you are expected back. As Wainwright says “There’s no such thing as bad weather, only unsuitable clothing”.

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Walk Details
A visit to Kingston’s huge square-towered church containing fine examples of Purbeck marble, is in itself, a worthwhile journey, but the added attraction of “a peep into the Encombe valley” is an…
The walk commences from the car-park by entering the main woodland track and turning right (signpost Houns-Tout). These woodlands are part of the Encombe Estate where the rambler is left in no doubt as to where they can or cannot walk!

Follow the main track until the route towards Houns-Tout branches off to the left (signpost) then continue onwards, ignoring the temptation to enter the confines of Hill View. Cross a stile to follow an obvious route, travelling high above the Encombe valley which offers spectacular vistas.
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The valley embraces Encombe House, built as a retreat for John Pitt (around 1770) and in modern times the family home of the Scott family (sometimes Earls of Eldon) for well over a century. The valley also houses the dairy buildings and a notable obelisk. The Scott’s benevolence funded Kingston’s church building costs. The obelisk was quarried at nearby Seacombe, and erected to the memory of Baron Stowell, the first Earl of Eldon’s elder brother.